Eye Exercises for Better Vision

Today’s technology may provide us with great convenience in the form of instant access to any information we want at the push of a button. But all luxuries come at a price. Staring at video monitors and smartphones and tablets for countless hours each day causes our eyes to fatigue more easily, and may lead to certain age-associated vision issues later in life. However, there are things we can do now that can protect our vision for the future. Consistently practicing simple exercises like the ones outlined here can keep your vision young and healthy for ages to come.

Try these simple eye exercises to help you maintain good vision and ward off those irritating eye floaters. These eye exercises can be performed at you desk at work, or upon waking and just before bedtime. Whenever your eyes feel fatigued, stop for a few minutes and give these exercises a try. Besides being healthy for your eyes, these exercises will also give you a mental boost to help you focus as well. By consistently practicing the exercises daily, you will begin to see optimal results in as little as one month.

- Start by Warming up your eyes. Vigorously rub your hands together for ten to fifteen seconds to generate heat. Place your hands over your eyes with your palms on your cheek bones and your fingers against your forehead for at least five seconds. Repeat the process three times.

- Roll your eyes. Begin by looking upwards and proceed to slowly circle your eyes ten times clockwise, and then ten times in a counterclockwise motion. Try to maintain a fluid controlled motion. Don’t let your eyes dart from position to position. This exercise takes practice to master, but once you do get it down, it is an excellent way to relax as well!

- Practice Focus. Grab a pencil and hold it at arm’s length while focusing your eyes upon it. Then, slowly bring the pencil closer to you until it reaches approximately six inches from your face. After that, slowly move it away while maintaining focus on the pencil. Repeat ten times. This exercise aids in strengthening the muscles that contract and reshape the lens in your eye. It is this reshaping that allows us to see up close. Keeping those muscles fit can delay the need for reading glasses that occurs as people age.

- Massage your temples. Using your thumbs, massage both your temples by pressing with light to moderate pressure against your temples and rotate. Massage twenty times in one direction and then twenty times in the other. Repeat the same motions midway over the eyebrows, then underneath the eyes on either side of the bridge of your nose.

- Give yourself a mini-nap. This one is really simple. Gently tilt your head backwards while closing your eyes. Relax and rest for a minimum of three minutes. This not only relaxes your eyes, it also relaxes your neck muscles and reduces strain. Warning, don’t let your boss catch you practicing this one at your desk. I doubt he’ll believe you are exercising.

Eyecare maintenance is easy to overlook. We were never taught the benefit of exercising our eyes. Just like running consistently can keep your heart younger and healthier, so too can exercising your eyes keep your vision younger and healtier. Stay on a healthy vision exercise program and the next time you see your optometrist, she will exclaim how much better your eyes are doing.

Phytonutrient Information

Phytonutrients are found in plants and usually concentrated in the skins of fruits and vegetables; these elements are what give them their color, flavor and scent. Your grandmother may not have known why she encouraged you to eat apples, oranges, and other fruits but she and others have been proven right. The more colorful your vegetables and fruits, the better they are for you. You should eat at least 7 differently colored fruits and vegetables each day.

The reason that phytonutrients are so important is that they have been shown to prevent mutations of cells while others help our cells communicate with each other. Some act as anti-inflammatories; scientists are becoming convinced that heart disease is partially a result of general inflammation in the body. In fact, phytonutrients are being used in commercially produced medications that are prescribed to lower blood pressure, help with the pain of arthritis, and even in asthma medicine and those for other respiratory problems. Phytonutrients also help lower bad cholesterol, which protects your heart and overall health.

Phytonutrients help neutralize free radicals, which are naturally occurring chemicals that lead to premature aging and disease. They help boost the immune system and might even help prevent certain types of cancer. Recent research has shown that phytonutrient-rich blueberries and bilberries actually slowed the aging process in the brains of lab rats. And it helped to maintain healthy vision.

Flavonoids are the phytonutrients that give fruits and vegetables their bright colors and protect them from disease, UV light, poisons, insects, and soil pollutants. They provide the immune system for plants. Flavonoids also aid in the prevention of many diseases in humans, protect from cell damage, lower blood pressure and help stop nerve degeneration. They strengthen the walls of veins and arteries, reduce the build up of plaque in blood vessels and keep them flexible.

Whole grains are also another source of phytonutrient nurtrition. This means that you can balance your frest fruit and vegetable consumption by eating healthy, whole grain breads and other baked products. Individuals who experience gluten intolerance can get phytonutrients by eating rice, quinoa, corn, millet and sorghum.

Fresh fruits and vegetables provide so many benefits from phytonutrients that it’s hard to list them all. You’ll be more resistant to viruses and other disease, particularly those that are not yet treatable with modern drugs. There was a time when vitamin C was recommended for a cold or flu and it was thought that it could even prevent these diseases. The reality is that even though ascorbic acid does provide the health benefits as shown, it is more effective in plant form instead of lab form. People who ate citrus and other fruits were found to be healthier and had a lower incidence of colds and flu than those that did not.